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Yufka Dough Recipe

Yufka Dough Recipe
Yufka Dough Recipe
This image courtesy of Kristin Teig

Yufka is nonleavened dough that is thinner than a tortilla and heartier than phyllo dough; it has a substantial bite but is still very flaky. It is rumored to be the original form of phyllo. Yufka is used to make many flatbreads, pastries, and borek, a baked or fried pie found in Turkey and the Middle East.

CostInexpensive

Total TimeUnder 30 minutes

Make Ahead RecipeYes

Five Ingredients or LessYes

Ingredients

  • 1 2/3 cup all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2/3 cup warm water
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus a little more (as needed)

Instructions

  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour and salt. Make a well in the center and pour in the water and olive oil. Using your fingers, draw the flour in from all sides, working the mixture until it’s sticky and forms into a ball. Turn the dough onto a floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, about 3 minutes. Transfer back to the bowl, drizzle with a little bit of oil, and turn to coat. Cover with plastic wrap and let rest at room temperature for at least 4 hours, or up to overnight.

  2. Divide the dough in half, then divide each half into three equal pieces; you should have six equal pieces, each weighing about 2 ounces.

  3. Roll out each yufka ball into a very thin 8- to 9-inch round, using plenty of flour to keep the dough from sticking to the rolling pin. Stack them on top of each other with a piece of parchment paper between them and plenty of flour or lay them out slightly overlapping on a baking sheet.

  4. Heat an 11- to 12-inch cast-iron skillet or nonstick pan over medium heat and cook the yufka on one side until it starts to bubble up and lightly brown on the bottom, about 2 minutes. You only need to partially cook each flatbread at this stage; don’t get them too crispy or they will be dry and hard to work with. Stack them on top of each other as you cook each one so that they lightly steam and keep each other soft and pliable.

  5. If you are not using immediately, transfer the warm yufka to a large zip-top plastic bag and store at room temperature up to overnight. You can also freeze the yufka for up to 2 weeks. After thawing, reheat briefly in a skillet over medium heat before using.

Note

When making flatbreads that require yufka dough, you can substitute commercial yufka, country-style phyllo, or lavash bread, but the results won’t be as flaky and tender as the yufka you make from scratch. All of the above substitutes are precooked so you can fill them and toast them as described in each recipe.

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