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Sarah Moulton

Sarah Moulton
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“I've always liked to eat,” says Sara. This decidedly prosaic reality turned Sara in the direction of cooking school after graduating from the University of Michigan with no particular plans.

Sarah Moulton
Sarah's Featured Recipe
Chicken Stock

Click here for recipe

One of the hardest-working women in the business, Sara Moulton has been juggling multiple jobs for years. Admired by millions as the host of Cooking Live, Cooking Live Primetime, and Sara’s Secrets, Sara was one of the Food Network’s defining personalities during the outlet’s first decade. In addition to her work on the Food Network, she worked in the test kitchen for 4 years and then took the job of executive chef of Gourmet Magazine for 21 years.  She was also the food editor of ABC-TV’s Good Morning America, for 15 years and the author of Sara’s Secrets for Weeknight Meals, Sara Moulton Cooks at Home as well as her most recent, Sara Moulton’s Everyday Family Dinners

 

Currently, Sara is hosting the fifth season of a cooking show on public television, titled Sara’s Weeknight Meals. The series demonstrates her rethinking of dinner to make it a meal that can break the mold and features fast and tasty entrees. She is also working on a new cookbook, focusing on techniques for the home cook, which will be published in the spring of 2016. Sara also writes a weekly column for the AP, called KitchenWise.

 

It was at the Culinary Institute of America that Sara found herself, she says. She graduated with highest honors in 1977 and began working in restaurants immediately, first in Boston and then in New York, taking off time only to apply herself to a postgraduate apprenticeship with a master chef in Chartres, France, in 1979. Sara’s restaurant experience peaked with a stint as chef tournant at La Tulipe in New York in the early 1980s. It was also during this period that Sara co-founded the New York Women’s Culinary Alliance, an “old girl’s network” designed to help women working in the culinary field. The Alliance celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2002. 

 

Sara left restaurant work to pursue recipe testing and development when she started a family. She worked for two years as an instructor at Peter Kump’s New York Cooking School (renamed the Institute of Culinary Education), where she discovered her love of teaching, a passion that would give focus to her subsequent work in television. In 1984 Sara took a job in the test kitchen at Gourmet. Four years later she became chef of the magazine’s executive dining room.

 

Her television career began in 1979 when she was hired to work behind the scenes on public television’s Julia Child & More Company. Her friendship with Julia eventually led to Sara’s gig at Good Morning America, where what started as another behind-the-scenes position ripened into on-camera work. By then Sara had begun hosting the Food Network’s Cooking Live.

 

Six years and more than 1200 hour-long shows later, the Cooking Live ended its run on March 31, 2002.  Sara’s Secrets began the next day. “Other TV chefs may own famous restaurants and perform with theatrical flair,” noted TV Guide’s Herma Rosenthal, “But Moulton’s the one you can actually picture popping over to help you fix the lumpy gravy or the fallen soufflé.”

 

Sara’s first book, Sara Moulton Cooks at Home embodies Sara’s mission as both author and television host: to counter America’s disastrous love affair with fast food by encouraging everyone to cook delicious and healthy food at home and to dine with family and friends. In her second book, Sara’s Secrets for Weeknight Meals, she delivers a collection of 200 easy-to-prepare recipes that are ideal for our time-crunched lives and that satisfy the taste buds.  

 

Sara lives in New York City with her husband and two children. Her website is saramoulton.com.

 

 

 

Latest Recipes

Crispy Zucchini Sticks with Olive Dip

In the early eighties I worked as chef tournant at La Tulipe, a three-star temple of French gastronomy in New York’s Greenwich Village. O...

(1 Votes)

Butternut Squash Soup with Gruyere Pesto

The generic recipe for winter squash soup or puree typically begins by calling for a scary amount of the squash “peeled, seeded, and cube...

(1 Votes)

Chicken Stock

Whenever I have homemade chicken stock in the freezer, I feel happy. I like starting with a base of nothing but chicken wings, which have...

(1 Votes)

Chopped Salad with Feta, Chickpeas, and Pita Croutons

Maybe it’s just because I’m a girl, but I love almost any kind of salad—and the more ingredients, the better. “Chopped salad,” a catchall...

(1 Votes)

Chicken Piccata

(1 Votes)

Grilled Swordfish with Greek Salad Salsa

When I was 15, my mom took my sister and me to Greece for spring break. Most of the food there was new to me. In fact—big surprise—even t...

(1 Votes)

Carrot “Fettuccine” with Spicy Shrimp

This recipe is the happy result of an unhappy incident. My friend and fellow chef Sandy Gluck was trying out for a job at a very fancy cu...

(1 Votes)

Portobello Burgers with Red Peppers and Gorgonzola

This is an absolutely wonderful meatless summer sandwich. In the center is a marinated and grilled portobello mushroom cap. It is filled ...

(1 Votes)

Tomato, Basil, and Cheese Tart with Pancetta Crust

I developed this tart in the mid-eighties for a column in Gourmet called “Gastronomie Sans Argent,” which loosely translated means “eatin...

(1 Votes)

Dulce de Leche Rice Pudding with Toasted Almonds

When Haagen-Dazs introduced its dulce de leche ice cream several years ago, the company hoped it would sell well to American Latinos, but...

(1 Votes)

Seared Beef in Autumn Broth With Wasabi Cream

This dish began as a variation on a French recipe called boeuf à la fìcelle (literally “beef on a string”), which requires the cook to ti...

(1 Votes)

Chicken Stock

I understand that most people are going to reach for a can of chicken stock on a weeknight (and yes, let’s be honest, even on a weekend)....

(1 Votes)

Fried Clam Sandwiches

I just love fried clams. Let me back up here—I actually love anything fried, but you can’t always justify it from the mess and caloric po...

(1 Votes)

Beer Batter

Beer batter is my favorite coating for deep frying, not because I want my fried foods to taste like beer (in fact, the beer flavor in a f...

(1 Votes)

Oven Fries

Everyone loves French fries, but who’s going to make them at home? They’re messy and require too much babysitting—and besides, they’re ha...

(1 Votes)

Cole Slaw

(1 Votes)

Rouille

We almost never encounter rouille—a garlicky, spicy red pepper sauce from the south of France—except as the garnish for the hearty seafoo...

(1 Votes)

Thanksgiving Hens

Rock Cornish game hens, a cross between a White Rock hen and a Cornish hen, are underrated. Maybe this is because, ounce for ounce, they ...

(1 Votes)

Southwestern Sweet Potato Sauté

Discovering the grating disk on my food processor many years ago was a eureka moment for me—ten minutes later I was grating and then saut...

(1 Votes)

Det Burgers

My first official cooking job was in the midseventies at a bar in Ann Arbor, Michigan (where I went to college), called the Del Rio. They...

(1 Votes)

Grilled Lamb and Onion Kabobs with Olive Aioli

Lemon, olive oil, rosemary, and garlic—this is my favorite marinade for lamb, whether I am cooking a roast or skewering kabobs. They work...

(1 Votes)

Mediterranean Orzo Pilaf

I love risotto for its creaminess—but not on a weeknight. It just doesn’t work unless you stand over it like a schoolmarm. Orzo, on the o...

(1 Votes)

Southwestern Sweet Potato Sauté

Discovering the grating disk on my food processor many years ago was a eureka moment for me—ten minutes later I was grating and then sau...

(1 Votes)

Rustic Potato and Greens Pie

When I was working in Gourmet’s test kitchen in the mid-eighties and we styled a dish to be photographed that didn’t look perfect, we’d t...

(1 Votes)
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