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Andrew Carmellini

Andrew Carmellini
Did you know?

Andrew cooked the food for his book in a tiny New York City kitchen. “No prep guys, no purveyor deliveries, no pro kitchen, just me lugging stuff home from the market and cooking dinner.” He goes on to say that if his wife Gwen can cook every recipe in the book, “so can you."

Andrew Carmellini
Andrew's Featured Recipe
Tomato Risotto

Click here for recipe

Andrew Carmellini is a chef based in New York City who has spent years abroad learning how to cook in Italy, France, and England. He started cooking at an Italian deli at age 14 in his home city of Cleveland, Ohio, and then later cooked in a French restaurant on the shore of Lake Erie before taking the train east to go to cooking school.

 

When Andrew studied at the Culinary Institute of America, he cooked for Governor Mario Cuomo on weekends. Upon graduation, he moved to Manhattan and worked the line at San Domenico before moving to Italy, where he absorbed all he could about that country’s food, wine and cooking styles. Upon his return from Italy, Andrew went to work with Gray Kunz at Lespinasse, where he spent three years before heeding the call to return to Europe. This time, he immersed himself in the food of France and the U.K. When back in New York, Andrew next worked at Le Cirque and CaféBoulud; he was chef de cuisine at the latter and the restaurant was awarded three stars by the New York Times.

 

Andrew opened A Voce in 2006 and earned what he proudly calls “my first Michelin star.” He left the restaurant two years later to write his first cookbook, Urban Italian: True Stories and Simple Recipes from a Life In Food, with his wife Gwen. Currently, the chef is busy planning another restaurant, which he promises will be located between the East River and the Hudson River on Manhattan Island.

 

Andrew has won two James Beard awards and was named Best New Chef by Food & Wine magazine. He has appeared on a number of televison shows including Martha Stewart, Iron Chef America, and Sara Moulton's Weeknight Meals.

 

He lives in New York with his wife, the writer Gwen Hyman, and his website is www.andrewcarmellini.com

Latest Recipes

Artichoke Fritto with Yogurt and Mint

This is my version of one of my favorite Roman foods: carciofi alla giuda, whole fried artichokes in olive oil. They’re served at outdoor...

(1 Votes)

Crispy Calamari Salad with Arugula, Fennel, and Lemon Sauce

On my first trip to Tokyo, I had this great fried calamari over seaweed with a spicy mayonnaise-based sauce. Later that year, I was sitti...

(1 Votes)

Tomato Risotto

I’ve been doing variations on this dish for the past ten years–sometimes getting really crazy, cooking the tomatoes for one dish five dif...

(1 Votes)

Marinated Chicken Alla Griglia

This is a simple marinated chicken–I used to make it all the time at home. The first time I tried this baby out, one of my cooks said to ...

(1 Votes)

Black Bass with Sicilian-Style Pesto

For years, I thought Sicilian pesto was some weird, made-up American sun-dried-tomato abomination. It wasn’t until my first trip to Sicil...

(1 Votes)

Potatoes Girarrosto-Style

These were inspired by the potatoes I ate during my long, cold, wet, dark winter in Torino–the ones that sat underneath the rotisserie ch...

(1 Votes)

Pine Nut Cake

Pignolata cookies are a staple in every Italian-American bakery from New York to San Francisco. This is a teacake version, and it’s great...

(1 Votes)

How to Roast Peppers the Easy way

People seem to think you’ve got to be crazy to roast peppers yourself at home. “Why not just buy them in those little jars?” they ask. We...

(1 Votes)

Garlic Dressing

This dressing kicks ass, and that’s all about the roasted garlic. For this recipe, I do what my grandma taught me the first time we made ...

(1 Votes)

Basic Tomato Sauce

This is the most important recipe in the book. If you make only one recipe from Urban Italian, 1 hope it’s this one. Tomato sauce is, of ...

(1 Votes)

Crumbs Yo!

Toasted breadcrumbs are one of my cooking secrets: I toss them in everything. They just make stuff taste better–they give everything a li...

(1 Votes)
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