← Back to Search Results
Turkey Stock

Photo by: Joseph De Leo
Comments: 0
 

Recipe

When it is time to clean up and put leftovers away after Thanksgiving dinner, my husband assigns himself the task of “dealing with the turkey.” He carefully carves whatever meat is still left on the carcass and arranges it in a container. While doing this, he sips wine and picks at the carcass, nibbling on those delectable morsels of meat that cling to the bone, which is precisely why he likes this chore. He also offers to chop the carcass into large chunks and store them in a separate container, and this delights me. Come Friday morning, while I’m shuffling around in slippers and sweat clothes, drinking my coffee, I open the refrigerator and pull out the chopped carcass ready for the stockpot. While some may head for the mall to tackle their Christmas lists, honestly, I’m happier lounging with the newspaper, watching the stock simmer.

Yield: 4-5 quarts

Ingredients

  • 1 turkey carcass, chopped into large pieces
  • 2 medium carrots (do not peel), cut into 2-inch chunks
  • 1 large yellow onion (do not peel), cut in half
  • 1 large rib celery, with leaves, cut into 2-inch chunks
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 6 sprigs fresh parsley

Directions

Put the chopped turkey carcass in an 8-quart stockpot, and add cold water to cover, leaving 2 inches of space at the top of the pot. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat; then reduce the heat so that the liquid simmers steadily. Using a large spoon or soup skimmer, skim off the brown foam that rises to the top. After 5 minutes or so, the foam will become white, and no more skimming will be necessary.

Add all the remaining ingredients. Partially cover the pot and adjust the heat so that the stock barely simmers. Cook the stock for at least 2 but preferably 4 hours, adding water, if necessary, to keep the bones covered.

Using a slotted spoon, transfer the bones, meat, and vegetables to a large, fine-mesh strainer set over a large bowl to catch all the juices. Discard the solids. Pour the stock through the strainer into the large bowl. Let cool. (To cool the stock quickly, set the bowl in a larger one filled with ice water, or fill a sink with about 2 inches of ice water.) Stir the stock, occasionally, to help cool it down. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

The next day, lift and scrape the congealed fat from the surface using a large spoon. Discard the fat. Store the stock, covered, in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. To keep longer, transfer to a freezer container or several small containers, allowing 1 inch of headspace, and freeze for up to 6 months.

VARIATION: CHICKEN STOCK

Follow the recipe for Turkey Stock, substituting 3 quarts (about 3 pounds) chicken parts for the turkey carcass.

Notes

Making your own stock is a snap and there is just no comparison between homemade stock and canned chicken broth. Every time you buy a whole chicken or cut-up parts, save the neck, wing tips, back, rib (breast) bones, gizzards, heart, and tail-all the leftover parts except the liver and store them in a 1-gallon lock-top storage bag in your freezer. (Date the bag and label it “for stock.”) Keep adding to it, and when the bag is full, make a pot of homemade stock.


© 2001 Diane Morgan

Note from Cookstr's Editors

Nutritional information is based on 32 servings.

 

Nutritional Information

Nutrients per serving (% daily value)

2kcal (0%)
1mg (0%)
0mg (0%)
16mcg RAE (1%)
8mg
0mg
0g
0g
0g
0g
1mg (0%)
2mg (0%)
0g (0%)
0g (0%)
0mg (0%)
 

Would you like to leave a comment about this recipe?

Notify me of new comments on this recipe. Add comment

We'd love to hear what you think!

Please or to add a comment to this recipe.
 

Discover Related Recipes

Explore Cookbooks on Cookstr

west-coast-cooking West Coast Cooking
by Greg Atkinson
gluten-free-and-vegan-holidays Gluten-Free and Vegan Holidays
by Jennifer Katzinger
parents-need-to-eat-too Parents Need to Eat Too
by Debbie Koenig
down-home-with-the-neelys-a-southern-family-cookbook Down Home with the Neelys: ...
by Gina Neely, Pat Neely
lucindas-authentic-jamaican-kitchen Lucinda's Authentic Jamaica...
by Lucinda Scala Quinn
flavor Flavor
by Rocco DiSpirito
fresh-from-the-market Fresh from the Market
by Laurent Tourondel
ham-an-obsession-with-the-hindquarter Ham: An Obsession with the ...
by Bruce Weinstein, Mark Scarbrough
mom-a-licious Mom-a-Licious
by Domenica Catelli
the-bread-bible The Bread Bible
by Rose Levy Beranbaum
the-new-basics-cookbook The New Basics Cookbook
by Sheila Lukins, Julee Rosso
hot-sour-salty-sweet Hot, Sour, Salty, Sweet
by Jeffrey Alford, Naomi Duguid
martin-yans-china Martin Yan's China
by Martin Yan
lucid-food Lucid Food
by Louisa Shafia
cooking-with-too-hot-tamales Cooking with Too Hot Tamales
by Mary Sue Milliken, Susan Feniger
Already a member? Click here to Log In
close

Sign up to Cookstr!

  • Receive a free, handpicked selection of recipes in your inbox weekly
  • Save, share and comment on your favorite recipes in My Cookstr
  • Get updates on new Cookstr features and tools







By signing up you accept the
Terms of Use and Privacy Policy
Spinner
New to Cookstr? Click here to Sign Up
close


Forgot your password? Click here
close
Thanks for commenting!
Would you like to share your comment on Facebook or Twitter?