← Back to Search Results
baking French
Korova Cookies

Photo by: Joseph De Leo
Comments: 2
 

Recipe

Sablés Korova

These easy-to-make, easy-to-eat, easy-to-love chocolate-chocolate chip cookies are from Pierre Hermé, the man Vogue magazine called "The Picasso of Pastry." They are cocoa dark, not very sweet, chock-full of chocolate bits, melt-on-your-tongue buttery, just crumbly enough to be true sablès, or sand cookies, and just salty enough to catch you off guard. In fact, the combination of chocolate and salt (Pierre uses the somewhat exotic fleur de sel sea salt from the Guérande) makes these cookies fatally appealing: I don’t trust myself not to finish the batch in a sitting, and I’ll bet you’ll find yourself in the same spot—a warning to make these when you’re certain not to be alone. Indeed, these are the easiest cookies to make for company because, despite their très French flavor, they are essentially American slice-and-bake icebox cookies. The dough is mixed in a flash, rolled into logs, and chilled, then cut into rounds and baked in minutes.

About the name: Korova was the name of the milk bar in Stanley Kubrick’s classic film, A Clockwork Orange. It was also the name of a restaurant off the Champs-Élysées for which Pierre Hermé created these cookies. The restaurant is gone, but the cookies are still a specialty at Pierre’s patisserie as well as the house cookies at my house.

Yield: MAKES ABOUT 36 COOKIES

Ingredients

  • 1¼ cups (175 grams) all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup (30 grams) Dutch-processed cocoa powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 stick plus 3 tablespoons (5½ ounces; 150 grams) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 2/3 cup (120 grams) packed light brown sugar
  • ¼ cup (50 grams) sugar
  • ½ teaspoon fleur de sel or ½ teaspoon fine sea salt 

  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 5 ounces (150 grams) bittersweet chocolate, chopped into small bits

Directions

1. Sift the flour, cocoa, and baking soda together and keep close at hand. Put the butter in the bowl of a mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and beat on medium speed until the butter is soft and creamy. (Alternatively, you can do this and all subsequent steps by hand, working with a sturdy rubber spatula.) Add both sugars, the salt, and vanilla extract and beat for another minute or two. Reduce the mixer speed to low and add the sifted dry ingredients. Mix only until the dry ingredients are incorporated—the dough will look crumbly, and that’s just right. For the best texture, you want to work the dough as little as possible once the flour is added. Toss in the chocolate pieces and mix only to incorporate.

2. Turn the dough out onto a smooth work surface and squeeze it so that it sticks together in large clumps. Gather the dough into a ball, divide it in half, and working with one half at a time, shape the dough into logs that are 1½ inches (4 cm) in diameter. (Cookie-dough logs have a way of ending up with hollow centers, so as you’re shaping each log, flatten it once or twice and roll it up from one long side to the other, just to make certain you haven’t got an air channel.) Wrap the logs in plastic wrap and chill them for at least 2 hours. (Wrapped airtight, the logs can be refrigerated for up to 3 days or frozen for 1 month.)

3. Center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 325°F (165°C). Line two baking sheets with parchment paper and keep them close at hand.

4. Working with a sharp thin-bladed knife, slice the logs into rounds that are ½ inch (1.5 cm) thick. (Don’t be upset if the rounds break; just squeeze the broken-off bit back onto the cookie.) Place the cookies on the parchment-lined sheets, leaving about 1 inch (2.5 cm) spread space between them.

5. Bake only one sheet of cookies at a time, and bake each sheet for 12 minutes. The cookies will not look done, nor will they be firm, but that’s just the way they should be. Transfer the baking sheet to a cooling rack and let the cookies stand until they are only just warm or until they reach room temperature—it’s your call. Repeat with the second sheet of cookies.

Notes

KEEPING: The dough can be made ahead and chilled or frozen. If you’ve frozen the dough, you needn’t defrost it before baking—just slice the logs and bake the cookies 1 minute longer. Packed airtight, baked cookies will keep at room temperature for up to 3 days; they can be frozen for up to 1 month

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS: In moments of over-the-topness, I’ve added chopped toasted pecans, plumped currants, and a pinch of cinnamon to the dough and loved it. And, I’ve been known to cheat on the chocolate bits. On the sad (but fortunately seldom) occasions when my cupboard is bare of Valrhona Guanaja (Pierre’s choice for these cookie, and one of my favorite chocolates), I’ve even used store-bought chocolate Chips.


© 2002 Dorie Greenspan
 

Nutritional Information

Nutrients per serving (% daily value)

Nutritional information is based a serving size of 1 cookie.

92kcal (5%)
8mg (1%)
0mg (0%)
30mcg RAE (1%)
39mg
10mg
1g
8g
1g
12g
9mg (3%)
52mg (2%)
3g (15%)
5g (8%)
0mg (3%)
 

Would you like to leave a comment about this recipe?

Notify me of new comments on this recipe. Add comment

We'd love to hear what you think!

Please or to add a comment to this recipe.
  • jessbair

    12.13.10 Flag comment

    These cookies really are delicious. I've made them several times, always a success and people always ask me for the recipe. I followed the recipe to the letter, no problems--love recipes like that!

  • jdcairo

    11.07.09 Flag comment

    I have made these cookies a number of times since I received "Paris Sweets" as a gift. They are a huge hit every time. All I ever get to bring home of these is an empty plate. Delish!

 

Explore Cookbooks on Cookstr

the-splendid-tables-how-to-eat-weekends The Splendid Table's How to...
by Sally Swift, Lynne Rosetto Kasper
bistro-cooking-at-home-more-than-150-classic-and-contemporary-dishes Bistro Cooking at Home: Mor...
by Gordon Hamersley
lucindas-authentic-jamaican-kitchen Lucinda's Authentic Jamaica...
by Lucinda Scala Quinn
a-new-way-to-cook A New Way to Cook
by Sally Schneider
how-to-be-a-domestic-goddess How to be a Domestic Goddess
by Nigella Lawson
the-country-cooking-of-ireland The Country Cooking of Ireland
by Colman Andrews
125-best-vegan-recipes 125 Best Vegan Recipes
by Maxine Effenson Chuck, Beth Gurney
cook-with-jamie Cook with Jamie
by Jamie Oliver
urban-italian-simple-recipes-and-true-stories-from-a-life-in-food Urban Italian: Simple Recip...
by Andrew Carmellini
the-south-american-table-the-flavor-and-soul-of-authentic-home-cooking-from-patagonia-to-rio-de-janeiro-with-450-recipes The South American Table: T...
by Maria Baez Kijac
baked-new-frontiers-in-baking Baked: New Frontiers in Baking
by Matt Lewis, Renato Poliafito
the-lee-bros-southern-cookbook-stories-and-recipes-for-southerners-and-would-be-southerners The Lee Bros. Southern Cook...
by Ted Lee, Matt Lee
fresh-from-the-farmers-market-year-round-recipes-for-the-pick-of-the-crop Fresh from the Farmers' Mar...
by Janet Fletcher
Already a member? Click here to Log In
close

Sign up to Cookstr!

  • Receive a free, handpicked selection of recipes in your inbox weekly
  • Save, share and comment on your favorite recipes in My Cookstr
  • Get updates on new Cookstr features and tools







By signing up you accept the
Terms of Use and Privacy Policy
Spinner
New to Cookstr? Click here to Sign Up
close


Forgot your password? Click here
close
Thanks for commenting!
Would you like to share your comment on Facebook or Twitter?