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Grated Daikon and Carrot Salad

Updated February 23, 2016
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The word daikon actually comes from two Japanese words, dai (large) and kon (root). And that’s just what it is. Daikon radish, a large white root vegetable, is often served grated in small quantities with Asian meals, since it’s considered a good digestive aid. I often combine it with one or two other vegetables—if one, that would be carrots, as presented here, and if two, I’ll also grate any broccoli stem I’ve saved in the fridge. It’s a refreshing little salad that goes with just about any kind of meal.

4 to 6 servings

CostInexpensive

Easy

Total Timeunder 15 minutes

One Pot MealYes

Recipe Coursevegetable

Dietary Considerationegg-free, gluten-free, healthy, lactose-free, peanut free, vegan, vegetarian

Equipmentfood processor

Five Ingredients or LessYes

Mealdinner, lunch

Taste and Texturecrisp, sharp, sweet

Type of Dishsalad

Ingredients

  • 1 large daikon radish
  • 2 medium carrots
  • 2 tablespoons flaxseed oil
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon agave nectar or natural granulated sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon dried dill
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Instructions

1 Cut the daikon and carrots into chunks and grate in a food processor.

2 Transfer to a serving bowl, add the remaining ingredients, and toss together. Serve at once.

VARIATION:

Grate the daikon radish and carrot separately and put into two small serving bowls. Divide the remaining ingredients evenly between them. Serve side by side.

Grate the daikon radish and carrot separately and put into two small serving bowls. Divide the remaining ingredients evenly between them. Serve side by side.

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I would love to try this recipe as well as the one with the broccoli stems since I am always looking for new ways to use those stems. I do have a question for Ms Atlas: why would you need to keep and serve the daikon and carrots separately? Many thanks. BC

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