Cookstr.com

Salmon Stock

Updated April 06, 2016
This image courtesy of Joseph DeLeo

Editor's Note: Salmon is a great source of many vitamins and minerals, including vitamin D - and on top of that, it's delicious. This Salmon Stock recipe is a method of cooking salmon that might be a little different than your typical salmon recipe, but it's a great way to use the head of the fish which might otherwise go to waste. Fish stock makes a wonderful base for many soups and stews, and you can typically buy the salmon scraps you need for this recipe for a much lower price than the rest of the salmon.
Salmon sport fishermen who are used to gutting, cleaning, and filleting their catches—and who don’t discard the salmon heads or use them for bait—can use the bones and head to make a lovely stock, beautifully pale peach in color. If you don’t go salmon fishing or have friends who fish, ask your fishmonger to save you a salmon head that has the gills removed. Salmon stock needs only an hour to simmer. Cooking the stock too long gives it a bitter taste.

Makes5 cups

CostInexpensive

Easy

Dietary ConsiderationDiabetic, Egg-free, Gluten-free, Halal, Kosher, Lactose-free, Low Carb, Peanut Free, Soy Free, Tree Nut Free

Type of DishStock

Ingredients

  • 1 salmon head (2 to 2½ pounds)
  • 1 small onion, quartered
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 carrot, cut into 2-inch chunks
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 5 peppercorns
  • 6 cups cold water
  • 1 cup dry white wine

Instructions

Rinse the salmon head and remove the gills, if necessary, leaving the gill plates intact. Using a sharp knife, split the salmon head in halflengthwise. Place the salmon in a 6-quart saucepan and add the onion, garlic, carrot, bay leaf, thyme, and peppercorns to the pan. Add the water and wine. The fish head should be completely submerged; if not, add a bit more water. Bring the liquid to a boil and then reduce to a bare simmer. Partially cover the pot and simmer for 1 hour.

Using tongs or a large, slotted spoon, transfer the pieces of salmon and the vegetables to a large fine-mesh sieve set over a large bowl to catch all the juices. Do not press on the solids. Pour the stock through the sieve into the large bowl. Discard the solids. Let the stock cool. (To cool the stock quickly, set the bowl in a larger one filled with ice water, or a sink with about 2 inches of ice water.) Stir the stock occasionally to help cool it down. Cover and refrigerate the stock for up to 2, days. Once the stock is chilled, skim any congealed fat from the surface using the side of a large spoon. To keep the stock longer, transfer to a freezer container, allowing 1 inch of headspace, and freeze for up to 6 months.

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